Why use integrated modelling?
  • 13 Sep 2022
  • 1 Minute to read
  • Dark
    Light

Why use integrated modelling?

  • Dark
    Light

Integrated modelling incorporates 1D river, 1D urban, and/or 2D modelling components with additional linking elements to enable them to exchange information dynamically as a simulation runs. This enables the user to take advantage of the best aspects of each modelling type.

What is needed to run an integrated simulation?

An integrated simulation involves 1D river, 1D urban, and/or 2D modelling components. So-called “link-references” (for connecting river and urban networks), “link-lines” (for connecting river networks and 2D components) or "link-elements" (for connecting urban networks and 2D components) must also be specified.

Flood Modeller provides functionality to allow you to define link-references and link-lines by drawing the connections directly onto your map view. Link-elements can be defined directly from a table of nodes. The simulation then accounts for flows between modelling components at these points; link-references allow water to flow between 1D urban and river networks, whilst link-lines and link-elements allow water to flow between 1D networks and the 2D domain. 

When setting up an integrated simulation, the 1D simulation must be referenced, alongside details of the connections. Together with the relevant 1D and/or 2D simulation results, the data passed across the linked aspects is calculated and provided as an additional output.

What can I visualise from an integrated simulation?

For visualising 2D and integrated modelling results, Flood Modeller’s map view again provides the ideal solution. Depth, velocity, flow and water level are all calculated by default for any 2D or 1D-2D linked simulation. Once loaded, flood data maps for each of these outputs can be viewed on the map. These also can be visualised as animations, with controls provided to select the exact timestep of interest.


Was this article helpful?

What's Next